Tag Archives: Roquefort

Quick Bites: Perail

Perail from Fromagerie Papillon: Photo by The House Mouse

Perail from Fromagerie Papillon: Photo by The House Mouse

Perail hails from the Aveyron region of France, where Roquefort is produced in a region that has a long history of sheep herding. There are many theories of how Perail came to be in existence. Stories range from the bloomy brie-like sheep’s milk wheels being created during low milk production, to shepherds holding back small amounts of milk from the larger Roqufort producers and creating the small pure sheep milk cheese in their homes for their families and neighbors. Whatever the stories and history may be, we are fortunate to have this tasty treat available to snack on now.

Perail at room temp. aged

Perail at room temp. fully ripened

Perail is a pasteurized sheep’s milk cheese with a thin, bloomy rind and soft, pale paste. When young, the interior is more firm and mild in flavor and the grassy notes are very apparent. Allow it to get a bit more ripe, which is what I did, and the rind collapses a bit, the “sheepy” barnyard flavors intensify, and the grassy, buttery, and sweet flavors come alive. Pair Perail with a light white or sparkling bubbly wine or perhaps a crisp hard cider.

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Celebrate the Super Bowl with Easy Gruyère and Andouille Gougères

Gruyère and Andouille Gougères: Photo take by The House Mouse

Gruyère and Andouille Gougères: Photo take by The House Mouse

The Super Bowl is this Sunday, February 1st and it’s the second largest day in America for food consumption behind Thanksgiving. Chips and dips along with various bean, veggie, or cheese spreads are the go-to food choices to eat during the Super Bowl, followed by chicken wings, popcorn and pizza. I get that these are traditional treats, why stay with the old boring stand-by? Serve up some tasty Gruyère and Andouille Gougères and guests won’t just be cheering for their favorite team. What’s a Gougères? Simply put, it’s a small ball of puffed of savory French Choux pastry made with just flour, eggs, salt, water and cheese. The cheese most commonly used for these simple treats is either Gruyère, Comté, or Emmentaler, however various forms of Blue, Roquefort, and Stilton have been used in recipes as well.

Follow the recipe below and score a touchdown at your Super Bowl 49 gathering tomorrow. Stay Cheesy!

 

Easy Gruyère and Andouille Gougères

Recipe courtesy of: Epicurious

Easy Gruyère and Andouille Gougères: Photo taken by The House Mouse

Easy Gruyère and Andouille Gougères: Photo taken by The House Mouse

Ingredients

1/2 cup unsalted butter

1/2 tsp kosher salt plus more

1 cup all-purpose flour

5 eggs

2 1/2 oz Gruyère, grated

4 oz andouille sausage, chopped

Prep & Cooking Instructions

Preheat oven to 425° with racks in upper and lower thirds. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper.

In a large saucepan, combine 1 cup water, butter, and 1/2 tsp salt. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. When butter has melted, add flour all at once, stirring vigorously with a wooden spoon. Reduce heat to medium; keep stirring until mixture has formed a smooth, thick paste and pulls away from sides of pan, about 3 minutes. Transfer to bowl of a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment or to a large heatproof bowl.

If using a stand mixer, add 4 eggs, 1 at a time, mixing on low-speed until egg is incorporated and dough is smooth before adding the next egg.

If mixing by hand, add 4 eggs, 1 at a time, stirring with a wooden spoon until egg is incorporated and dough is smooth before adding the next egg. The mixture should be very thick, smooth, and shiny. Stir in Gruyère and andouille.

Use a tablespoon measure to drop dough into 1″ rounds about 1 1/2″ apart on prepared baking sheets. You should have about 24 gougères.

In a small bowl, whisk remaining egg with a pinch of salt. Brush the top of each gougère with egg wash.

Bake for 15 minutes. Reduce oven to 375°, rotate baking sheets, and continue baking until gougères are puffed and browned, about 15 minutes more. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Cook Note:

I used Kerrygold Unsalted Butter  and Emmi Gruyère for added flavor. These were personal choices and not solicited brand suggestions.  Do not be in a hurry after adding the flour or the Gougères will have a more dense texture. They’ll still taste great, just won’t have that light, airy feel that a true Gougères should have. Finally, ratio is important, so watch the amount of cheese (I should have listened to you, Michael Ruhlman…I’ll know better next time.)

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An Ode to Cheese for National Poetry Month

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The Missing Piece by Shel Silverstein

My parents were – and still are – voracious readers, and they encouraged my sister and I to do the same as much as possible. While my sister read on occasion, I would get lost in a bookstore for hours, curl up on the giant square pillows the local shop had strewn all over the children’s section and just sink into a pile of books. My mom volunteered at our school library sometimes and was always hip to the latest trend and bestselling authors, so she would offer suggestions all the time. My dad was not as in touch with the adolescent brain so he would pick titles that appealed to him or chose covers that looked cool and distinct. Continue reading

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Review: Monte Enebro packs a punch of awesome

I have gone totally goaty lately, which is good since it is National Goat Cheese Month. My selections have ranged from fresh and tangy to pungent and earthy, most of which I have devoured with pleasure. None, however, have stopped me in my tracks and brought an audible “WOW!” from my lips the way Monte Enebro has. Continue reading

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Fumigating Fromage Proves Fatal!

French farmer discovers smelliest cheese in the world, 3 dead

The French are known to produce some of the smelliest, most intense cheeses in the world.  From the mildly offensive Roquefort to the bus-banned Epoisses, French cheeses are among the stinkiest and oft-times most tasty. Unfortunately, the latest attempt at funk has proved fatal.

Three people have died and five more were injured at the unveiling ceremony for Normandy’s newest stinky cheese, Chausettes de Fesses (translation: socks of buttocks).

“It was not the reaction I was expecting,” explained local dairy farmer Marcel Vachequirit. “The cheese is beautiful, perhaps my finest ever cheese, and yes – I admit – it does have quite a tang, but the mortality rate so far is astonishing.”

You can read more about this cheesy tragedy on The Daily Shame.

photo: The Daily Shame


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A brief history of cheese

What do Napoleon, Emperor Charlemagne, and Charles de Gaulle have in common? Besides being heavy-duty leaders in history, these guys loved their cheese. Wonder how Camembert got its name or the difference between blue cheese, Roquefort, and Gorgonzola? Dubby Bhagat of The Himalayan Times has put together a brief list of some famous cheeses and how they came into being.

For a more in-depth history, check out The Nibble’s article which breaks down cheese throughout history by time period. No surprise the Dark Ages were stagnate for cheese innovation.

Read full articles at Saying Cheese and The History of Cheese.

Photo source: Mentalfloss

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